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September 15, 2009

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Stacey

Thank you so much for this! I nursed my daughter for 12 months, and it was a mutual decision between us both to begin the weaning process. It was amazing how she and I BOTH felt it was time. No matter how long you nurse, there is always an enormous amount of benefit physically, spiritually, and emotionally. Your writing is beautiful and inspiring.

Namaste,
Stacy

Kelly

Thank you so much for this post Taz! I am 8 and 1/2 months pregnant with my first baby and planning to nurse. Your post was so lovely, soothing, honest, personal and touching ~ it is so helpful hearing other people's accounts of mothering and specifically nursing. Thank you, Most sincerely, Kelly

Namaste

Thanks for the sweet and very personal account of your experience with your daughter. I've been nursing my baby for 17 months and this particular exchange has been one of the deepest and most meaningful of my life.

preciousmagic

I nursed my daughter, Naomi, for 22 months. It was a profound and joyful experience and though I had days where I wished I could 'take a break', it was a precious exchange that filled me with awe and gratitude every time!

Michelle Tortora

You are dead on! I am still nursing my 2 year old son. I wanted to night wean him at 12 months, (I've been nursing for 4 years straight now since I was previously nursing my now 4 year old) but my husband urged me to continue because something just wasn't "right" with him at night. Nothing else worked to comfort him. So I continued and thank God I did.
That "something not right" turned into a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder at 18 months of age. Nursing proved to be the one time we could connect since he had no language, made no eye contact and basically ignored everyone around him. But when he nursed, he would cuddle and be calm. If I didn't have that nursing time with him, I think I would have felt completely disconnected with him.
Also, we learned that his ASD certainly stemmed from his gut. I immediately changed both of our diets to a gluten/casein free diet. Like, the day I found out I threw everything out of the fridge and pantry. Cold turkey, my son and I began a new diet. Easy for me, hard for an 18 month old who only ate bagels and gold fish for solid food. As he went through withdrawals for a solid week, I nursed him almost constantly. He did not touch any solid food for weeks, subsisting on nursing alone. I don't know if I could have kept up the diet and withholding his favorites, except I knew he was being nourished by my milk.
Only six months later, my son has more words than I can count. He does not flap his arms constantly and bang his head against the wall in pain. He plays with other children and laughs at jokes. His chocolate brown eyes look into mine and he says "nurse!" and I gladly oblige every time.

www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=538025925

Thank you! I am still nursing my daughter who is 26 months. It is very difficult to find support nursing a toddler! We just went through a challenging period which left me searching for support, my local LLL leader and a good friend was all the support I had to continue breastfeeding. I don't know how long we will continue to nurse but both of us will know when it's time to be done. I am cherishing my last baby and the bond that we have breastfeeding!

Kathryn Predojevic

that is lovely, thank you for posting the link of facebook (thats how I found it) i too an nursing a toddler, with no desire to see the end. As well I nursed 2 toddlers before this one, and hope to nurse another baby grow to toddler as well. It is everything you said. you described all of it so well. They way you find a place for the arms and legs, and toes :) How we nestle together with our little ones, and the soft breathing, and toddler relaxing in our arms, allow us to take a deep breath and let the worries go.
thank you again. I needed that reminder!

Kayla Speer

This comment brought me to tears, so riveting I thank you for sharing something so personal, beautiful and relateable. My daughter is 8 months old and from the get I've set a goal of 12 months and see where her and I are at. Reading this makes me want to never stop :o) Breastfeeding is truly an amazing bond. All I need is her to gaze deep into my eyes and I'm centered, nothing matters but that precious gem you hold in your arms. Even the biting doesn't make me want to stop, because the time spent together is the real everlasting impression imprinted on my heart, forever. Thanks again for reminding me how spectacular this mama journey is. Blessed...

Sam Lowes

I didn't breastfeed but I can't seem to take away the bottle from my near two year old. It''s nice to see that toddlers still need the comfort of the breast. There's something comforting about sucking (bottle or breast) and I'm in no rush to force her off it.

Nancy Matsunaga

If you and your little one both still love it, why wean? Just because society tells us it's weird to nurse a toddler? My little guy is also coming up on 18 months and we both love our breastfeeding relationship. We're not planning to quit anytime soon!

M Ayerst

My daugther self weaned at 12 months...my son is not breast feading a lot and he is ony 10 months. Taz I am actually quite an expert on this topic and I can tell you really didn't have to do much.

Holly

Good for you both for still loving and enjoying your breastfeeding moments, and do what feel right for you both in the weaning question. There are only 2 people who can make that decision, so don't worry about what society sets as a guide line.

As a formula mom, I just wanted to point out that you still get the same feelings of love and connection. I love feeding time with my son, his calm expression as he smiles up at me and nuzzles in for a bottle. There are many other ways to feel connected and show love. You may miss out on this one as marches on, but you will be surprised (and just as happy) at all the new connections that develop!

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